72 Hours After Facebook

Has it really been three days already?  I’ve hardly thought about Facebook at all today.  I had an eye appointment, the kids spent the afternoon playing in the pool while I did my favorite pastime (list making) and this evening was an early dinner and bedtime for the three worn out little ones.  I’m hoping to get some more cleaning and organizing done this evening since the day was so busy.

I am excited to keep blogging and fill in the details as I go.  I need to actually block some time off for this though, otherwise it will consume my mental narrative much like Facebook did, and it will be distracting.  I’ve noticed that my blog is already replacing some of that mental space I freed up in deleting Facebook, and I don’t want that to get out of hand or I’ll have to quit this too!  Moderation is key and I will be focusing quite intently on that as I start out.

I don’t want to try to do too much too fast.  But there are also so many things I’d like to say.  All in all I don’t think (at this point) I will ever return to having a personal Facebook profile.  It took much more than it gave, and in the end I don’t have room in my life for things like that.  I think it can be an amazing tool and I almost wish that I had found it later in life when I had a better idea of what I wanted out of my internet connections and resources.  But I am perfectly fine without it as it stands.

My dear husband has remarked to me several times today how happy I seem and how even when I do get grumpy I rebound much faster.  I’m not sure at this point if that’s just a correlation or really a direct result of my new-found freedom, but it’s certainly a great start to the journey!  I think I was expecting it to be much more difficult than this, but there is still plenty of time for me to hit some bumps in my post-Facebook road.  Perhaps the craving for that newsfeed will come back.  Stay tuned to find out I suppose!

First 48 Hours Post-Facebook

The first 48 hours without Facebook are officially over, and I am feeling great about it honestly.  I didn’t realize just how much of my mental energy was taken up by that one, virtual part of my life.  I am purging my house of a ton of clothes, toys, etc. right now and deactivating my Facebook account feels quite a lot like hauling fifteen boxes of junk out to the car and saying “So long!” It’s a breath of fresh air, a clean home, space to think and live.

My mind is free from surfing on Facebook, free from spending time on meaningless articles I found on Facebook, free from worrying about a dozen problems that aren’t even mine, free from wondering if I have new notifications, free from the drama of Facebook groups.  I’m free from all of it. And it is a totally liberating feeling.

Freedom is one word that encapsulates all of my why.  Why leave Facebook?  Freedom is why.  When I first started using Facebook it was in its infancy, before it was super cool and when you had to be in college to get an account.  I had a few friends and it was a neat concept, to be able to keep in touch with people who were far away or who might be far away a few years down the road.  Everything I posted felt “private” because most of us only had like ten friends on there anyway.

Over the years Facebook changed and Facebook habits changed along with it.  As more and more people joined and groups became connecting points, friends lists exploded.  People began sharing more than quick chats between each other and sharing other things they had found on the internet: pictures, videos, articles galore.  Advertisements came, Facebook started becoming connected to other sites, to your email and then your phone.

Before we knew it, Facebook wasn’t just a glorified virtual directory anymore – it was an institution.  It had become woven into the fabric of our very lives, intertwined with everything we did, everywhere we went, everyone we talked to.  Before I knew it, Facebook had become my main source for information on many topics.  And it was the main mode of communication I had with almost everyone outside of my immediate family unit.  Not to mention it was the catch-all for my cherished memories, pictures and videos.

I have considered dumping Facebook for years.  There are many reasons, but mostly I realized that Facebook was no longer a tool helping me – it had become the driving force in much of my daily life and routine.  But how could I leave?  Nothing could quite replace the diverse supports and services that Facebook was offering me.  And so it stayed.

But what I realized was that some things just mattered more.  When the authenticity of some of my online friendships started coming into question it became apparent that no matter what the credientials of the person or how long I had been connected to them – if I didn’t know someone in person I really didn’t know that person.  I had to figure this out more than once before it stuck.

651662177095I needed out of this virtual relationship building platform that was so unstable and unsafe.  I needed to get back to the real, incarnate, flesh and blood relationships God had given me.  (Yes I’m talking about those lovely people right there.)  I’m only two days into this change, but the healing is already beginning to happen.  For so long I said “I wish I could give up Facebook but…” And I have others saying that to me now.

My only advice is, you can. And if you wish you could but you don’t that means that Facebook is no longer a tool in your tool box, it is running the show.  And that in itself is a reason to (Elsa voices everyone!) let it go.  😉

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